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Global/African Philanthropy and Policy Research Conference 2017

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Global African yearly’s PHILANTHROPY and POLICY RESEARCH CONFERENCE with its Value-added Workshops / Trainings for societal development process. There are also the presentation of evidence-based and solution-driven research papers/projects, research magazine publication, exhibition, and an unconditional means of networking/synergy possibilities.

3rd Edition in #EUROPE

29 – 30 April 2017 | Linz / Austria

It’s time for ACTIVATION, SYNERGY, EXCHANGE of IDEAS, INCLUSIVE/PERSONAL GROWTH, GREEN JOBS CREATION, NETWORKING & SUSTAINABILITY, CORPORATE SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT, and SKILLS FORMATION.

FOCUS GROUPS:

NGOS, NPOs, FOUNDATION, TRUST, GRANTS GIVERS, INSTITUTIONS, EDUCATION CENTRES, MIGRANTS ORGANISATION, COMMUNITIES, UNIVERSITY, (ETHNIC) ENTREPRENEUR, STARTUPS, POSTGRADUATES, SCHOLARS, STUDENTS, POLICYMAKERS, RESEARCHERS, TEACHERS, LECTURES, …and YOU.

Topic: ” MUTUAL LEARNING in POLICY and SOCIETAL DEVELOPMENT PROCESS.”

We build our collective future together “”

Contact for Participation and Submission of Research Papers/Projects:
Bruno Eddy
Organizer / Project Leadership
office@hiba.at

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GLOBALIZATION AND THE CHANGE OF SOCIAL INEQUALITIES IN MODERN SOCIETY

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Eddy Bruno – Labour Market Researcher & Political Economist

Globalization is “meeting of processes that have led to growing international networking” (Alasuutari 2000). In recent years, it has increased with the rapid advances in information technology, the collapse of the Eastern bloc, and the associated opening up of new markets, as well as the rise of Asian countries. Moreover, since the 1980s, the process also shows the interaction of the following four macrostructures: (A) the increasing internalisation of markets and the resulting growing competition between countries with very different wage and productivity levels and different social standards; (B) the intensification of competition between the social states and the resulting consequences; (C) the rapid worldwide networking of people, stakeholders, and States; and (D) the rapid rise in the significance of globally linked markets and the associated increasing interdependence and volatility of local markets. However, on the one hand, productivity gains and improvements in the general standard of living have led to a growing general uncertainty. Equally, the following changes are also to be noted: (I.) It is increasingly difficult for all actors to make rational decisions, in particular of long-term life`s commitments; (Ii) long-term decisions have become increasingly difficult, resulting in a socio-economic shift in favor of short-term planning; and (Iii) there has been a shift in the power constellations on the labor market, which has impacted asymmetrical relations (i.e. “temporary work or temporary contracts”) on the labor market (Blossfled et al. 2007) This has spilled out disappointments, loss of trust, reduction in family, and welfare function, which are attributable to four central changes in the personal life histories and resulting social patterns of inequality in different societies in the world.

Therefore, the four central transitions in life and work are:
A) Young people and Young adults – the losers of Globalization:
They are confronted with increasing rise of uncertainty in the labor market, which manifests itself in precarious and atypical forms of employment (e.g., part-time work, precarious forms of self-employment, temporary employment, and cohort comparison of lower incomes etc.). There is also a lack of professional experience and networks, which makes entry into the “internal” labor market particularly difficult. The effects vary according to welfare and employment regimes with the experience “more serious in the US than “flexible forms of employment in the European insider-outsider markets.” In addition, education has become more and more important, as low-skilled entry-level workers are particularly punished and disadvantaged within the system. In addition, because of life’s uncertainties, young adults are mainly without children, which is an economic and socially rational structural development.
B) Middle-income men – the winners of Globalization
On one hand, the employment conditions of well-qualified male workers are stable and are protected against flexibilisation by employers. On the other hand, low-skilled and less established workers such as education graduates or young adults are punished. There are also country-specific differences in labor market, welfare arrangements, and determinants such as individual resources – educational qualifications and professional human capital.
C) Women in the middle of their lives are marginalized.
However, despite labour market integration, women are primarily engaged in a precarious way and in all modern societies, unpaid family and care activities are still largely taken over by women. They are disproportionately flexible in working forms (such as, precarious part-time jobs, unsafe and low-paid employment, jobs with lower career prospects, high risk of a decline or unemployment) to meet the parallel family obligations. Likewise, development patterns vary in different regimes and the individual resources (educational capital) centrally determine the life and work process.
D) Employees in the early retirement age
However, due to the new flexibility requirements, older workers have several comparative competitive disadvantages compared to younger labor market competitors. They are also perceived as “less flexible, not adequately qualified and cost-intensive” by firms (ibid). Moreover, they are strategically motivated by attractive financial incentives to early exit – “early retirement strategy” [e.g. In the Central and South European countries] or through the following strategies. On the one hand by the market mechanism [e.g. In the liberal states] or through state mechanisms for the enhancement of adaptability – an active labor market policy, state support for lifelong learning and professional qualification [e.g. Social Democratic States of Scandinavia].

Despite that, the is a development of Social Patterns of Inequality in the Globalization Process
I. Regimes with inflexible employment systems: (e.g., German, Italy, Spain)
The speech here is from a regime that leads to an intensification of inequality between insiders / outsiders and which has led society into a highly secure and well-earning group on the one hand and a marginalized group of people on the other. This affects mainly job-seekers, women, as well as the unemployed and unqualified whose problems have intensified on the labor market. In southern European regimes, the inequality is most pronounced as labor market structures are even more rigid and the welfare state is much more fragmented than in the conservative countries of central Europe. Hence, inflexible regimes have fostered the inequality between the generations by “older people (or former insiders), whose employment flexibility through high pensions is comparatively socially secured, and (…) young people who make their flexibilisation in the labor markets with comparatively little social security and relatively low risk compensation, as well as the financing and high social security of the “disrupted generations” (ibid).
II. Employment-demanding regimes
There is a great difference between the market-oriented liberal and the social-democratic countries. Liberal labor market and welfare state systems are relatively easy to meet through dismissals and wage adjustments (such as, in the US and the UK), which point to a high level of mobility as well as significant wage differences between groups with different qualifications. These inequalities are little cushioned by welfare state policies and benefits that have shifted the labor risk to individual resources with increasing labor market flexibility. In contrast, the social democratic countries (such as the Denmark) make it possible to increase employment flexibility with comparatively strong state support measures that help the reintegration of the unemployed. At the same time, the entrepreneurs have little scope for wage flexibility , which can be observed with a higher workload mobility and thus caused social inequalities between younger and older generations as well as within one generation.
III. Post-socialist regimes
The risk of unemployment as well as wage inequality has risen strongly in these countries after the fall of the socialist system, but the country-specific flexibility strategies are very different. In the same way, the social inequalities between workers have therefore strongly increased with insiders and outsiders problems

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Y-SkillLab Training to smooth School-to-Work Transition Process

 

 

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The school-to-work transition process is a path full of uncertainties and difficulties. Most especially, young people and young adult between 15-19, 19-24, and 24-29 face lots of challenges with early career and first entry into the job market. In addition, the often have inefficient specific skills with precarious contracts and working poor (tendency of working, but not able with the current earnings to meet up with financial demands). Nevertheless, who are those suffering from this social risk? Of course the young people, especially those without the necessary social capital (networking, education attainment, relatives in top ranking position etc.).

In this case, social capital is an essential prerequisite that serves as an entrance card into the labour market system. However, in many countries, it`s limited because young people are often knocked out of the education system with insufficient skills and negatives remarks. This will equally reduce their social mobility and deprived them from basic needs.

In order to smooth young people school to work transition process, Y-skillLab project is designed to tailored solution-driven active labour market measure. It`s to assist and support young people with acquired specific employers’ skills (such as entrepreneurial skills, literally skills, language skills, media competence, etc.) which serves as a prerequisite to employment and entrepreneurship. Therefore, through this active labour market measure we have offered laptops to a community in Cameroon. It is to facilitate disadvantaged young people to have access to upgrade their skills and smooth the school to work transition process.

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Eddy Bruno: HIBA Founder and Project Leader

 

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Help for orphans

Here are the photos of 250 Orphans that we care for the this August – Septermber 2015 with social welfare and basic needs like cloths, school bags, pen , pencisl and other need. we visited their homes in cameroon and we are as well looking forward to support most of them again . We are planing from December 2015 to support more that 350 of Orphans. The children are between the age of 4 months till about 18 years old…..

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Helping people in need

There are many people in need living in cameroon. After a meeting this september till August 2015 between the president and founder of Hiba Mr. Esien with some of the members of the group we dedicded to support them with sustainable materials. There are about 400 in number which we need to support from this year 2015 and we are greatfull of your collective support so we can futher support them with sustainable need. Most of the them are parents with children who are not only in need for themselves but for their childrens. Thanks for your support in advance.

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2. Phase – Nursery School

2en Phase of Nursery school Project 2015.
We handed over some benches to the school on the 31 0f December 2014 as the second Phase of the Nursery School Project that have to occured from December 2014 up till December 2015. The 3rd Phase is already in planing where we are expecting the acceptance and signature of the Government Administrator permiting us to continued with the buildings of the structure. The construction and building of the structure shall shall begin during the first 1/4 of the year. The land have already been handed during the kickoff ceremony of the Nursery School Project at the temporary School premisses which was attended not only by Mr Eddy Bruno the founder , President of HIBA but a Group of Guest from Austgria as well as HIBA Crew in Cameroon. The president and founder of HIBa would be traveling again as soon as possible to cameroon in other to personally assist during the building of the structure.

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1st Youth Capacity Building Conference in Kumba, Cameroon

1.st Youth Capacity Building Conference in Kumba, Cameroon
Organized and initiated by Bruno Eddy, HIBA Founder, President & Philanthropist on the 29.12.14 at Kumba II council where youths between 15 till 29 years old benefited from motivational trainings as well as workshops to empower them overcome youth unemployment, to acquired soft skills and improved their employeability to reduce underemployment and boost up thier strength as well as path from school to work. The coneference was also attended by guest from Austria, the delegate of youth in Kumba II council, Secretary General of Kumba II council, 1st Assistant SDO meme Division representing the SDO of Meme Division, the Mayor of Kumba II and many other administrators as wel as guest related to youth welfare and topics. More than 130 Youths from Kumba Cameroon attended and directly benefits from the workshop which also youth growth, improved their inter personal as well as societal development

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Visit to a church orphanage in Kumba

The founder and president of HIBA Mr. Eddy Bruno with guest from Austria and Crew in Cameroon visiting Cleric Orphanage on the 31.12.2014 in Cameroon to support children with basic needs and social welfare. 25 children benefited from our support and welfare protections. We offer them with cloths, playing toys, didactic materals (pen, pencils, bags etc.) and some other stuff to reduce the rate of child poverty and inequality in the society

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Visit to Emmauel Orphanage in Limbe

Visite to Emmauel Orphanage in Limbe.
Saturday the 27.12.2014 we visite Emmauel Orphanage in Limbe where we supported the childiren with social and welfare basic needs like cloths, didactic materials and some other stuff to support them reduce the rate of inequality as well as reduce child poverty. About 20 children benefits from our supports. We shall be back for more supports. Greetings to the children.

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